Updated 2012-08-27 21:47:56 by LkpPo (Redirected from disneylogic)

The site http://www.algebraist.com/ is 404.

I'm Jan Theodore Galkowski, a.k.a. disneylogic in the discussions. This is my Tclers' Wiki home page. I have a Web site [1] and a blog [2] if you are interested. My professional page is http://www.scguild.com/usr/1707I.html.

I'm a contract software and database developer, and also test engineer. I own a small business, The Smalltalk Idiom, which specializes in laboratory workflow software and in inexpensive data warehousing and BI solutions for small businesses. I also do road warrior gigs for bigger clients helping them with databases and with system acceptance testing. More about me can be found on a listing [3] at the great but too little known realrates.com[4] site.

The Smalltalk Idiom used to specialize in software written in Smalltalk (see http://www.goodstart.com/) but the needs of clients, the times, and the technology argues for faster development processes and models. As a devoted Smalltalk developer and avid LISP programmer with 'lots' of experience in many languages, I've settled on Tcl/Tk as my standard development vehicle. Indeed -- and probably to the great annoyance of Tcl/Tk experts -- my Tcl/Tk style 'looks' like it's Smalltalk. But, then, that's the point of The Smalltalk Idiom.

Background? B.S., Physics, 1974, Providence college. S.M. EE & Computer Science, MIT, 1976, with RA and TA at the Tute's late great Artificial Intelligence Lab. I was at IBM Federal Systems Division in Owego, NY, from 1976 until the IBM division was sold to Loral in 1994. I remained there until 1995 when I set out on my own as a contract developer. I have been doing that since, with a 3-year stint at Cornell University. I'm back on the road again.

Recently I've been working laboratory workflow software using Pervasive.SQL [5], a relational database, and Tcl/Tk. I've also been doing test engineering for clients, this time for an FAA[6] system and its prime contractor. Tcl/Tk plays a big role there, too, particularly in competition with MATLAB[7] as a numerical tool.

I am also interested in Ted Nelson's[8] ZigZag[9] and am pursuing ANON [10] based on some of Ted's ideas.